"Gardening is about enjoying the smell of things growing in the soil, getting dirty without feeling guilty, and generally taking the time to soak up a little peace and serenity. " ~Lindley Karstens

Wednesday, September 1, 2010

Mystery Wild Orchids In Blooming

At the beginning of this year, during my clean up of the aftermath of our January Freeze, I found some mystery plants in the front garden.  I posted the pictures on my blog, and some fellow bloggers helped me to identify those as some kind of orchid, most probably a Lady Slipper orchid (Paphiopedilum)!  Wow, I was very excited, and was looking forward to those gorgeous Lady Slipper flowers someday showing up on my wild orchids.

Here is a picture that was posted when I first found them.

Some of plants were dug out to put in the pots, and some were left in the original spot.  I even passed along some to my friends.  For two or three months, I checked their progress very often, but they did nothing, even the leaves did not have noticeable growth.  So I stopped checking them, they were left under the bushes, and got the rainfall irrigation like any plant in wild does.

A couple of weeks ago, I surprisingly found out that there were flower spikes shooting up from them.  They looked just like the regular orchid flower spikes.  Since the buds were very small, I started suspecting if it is LadySlipper orchid or not.  Finally, now they are blooming.  The flowers are very small, only a penny size.  The flower does look like an orchid, but definitely not like a LadySlipper orchid.

Just give you an idea the size of the flowers, this is a picture of this wild orchid placed next to a dendrobium orchid container.


Since the flowers are so small, I had hard time to get them focused on camera to show you the detail. This is about the best I can do.



Yes, I was a little disappointed, but I am not complaining.  I still consider my garden is blessed to have wild orchids growing.  After all, I did not even pay a penny for these orchids.  As small as the flowers are, they do look pretty up close.  Don't you think?

Anybody has seen something like this before?  Still would like to know if it has some official name.  The leaves are mottled, just look like some Lady Slipper orchids' leaves.   I think that was the major reason that it was identified as Lady Slipper at the beginning.

20 comments:

  1. I remember when you first found those orchids... what a blessing to have wild orchids. I love the tiny blooms. Don't know the name of them either but I have a feeling you are going to enjoy them for a long time to come.
    Meems

    ReplyDelete
  2. Ami! How exciting!! You must be exstatic...I know I would be! Good for you! Great find and save!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oops. This looks like Oeceoclades maculata, aka Monk Orchid, which has naturalized in South Florida. That bloom always helps in ID'ing, doesn't it?

    ReplyDelete
  4. Ami ~ What a sweet little orchid that decided to make its home in your gardens. I love the delicate little blooms and know you're going to enjoy them.

    FlowerLady

    ReplyDelete
  5. Lucky you! Those are so cute. I'm glad Floridagirl was able to ID them for you. Dainty little blooms and free can't be beat.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I love how orchids bloom best when left alone under a tree somewhere. A very delicate little bloom. Sometimes the small flowers you have to stoop down to see closer are the ones that make you stay in a garden just that little bit longer....

    ReplyDelete
  7. Pretty little orchids.
    I guess you are wondering now whether you want to continue keeping them for your attention after seeing the blooms isn't it?

    ReplyDelete
  8. They look so sweet and pretty. Wild orchids are so exotic.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I think its a sweet little orchid. I have a little wild one much smaller again than yours that grows in my garden and I feel quite priviledged that one has taken residence there. I'm sure you feel the same way Ami!

    ReplyDelete
  10. FloridaGirl:

    Thanks for identifying this orchid for me again! I looked up, and I do believe Oeceoclades maculata is the right name for this orchid.

    To All:

    Thanks for all your nice comments! I believe what FloridaGirl identified is correct, this wild orchid is Oeceoclades maculata, aka Monk Orchid. Unfortunately, this one is also listed as one of invasive species, and currently only can be found in South Florida.

    It is kind of hard to believe an Orchid can be "invasive"... For now, I will try to contain them in my own garden, and I do like their sweet little blooms though!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hi Ami...I remember when you first posted on them and I was envious of your discovery. How exciting that they have bloomed for you...they are darling. I'm still envious! :-)

    If no one can I.D. them, try Prem over at Flnativeorchids.com. He's an expert.

    Enjoy your unique find.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I just think it is so amazing that you actually found wild orchids growing outdoors in the garden. Any orchids in our area are found inside, like my two moth orchids beind my kitchen sink ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  13. definitely pretty! That's wonderful that you saved these little guys. They're survivors!

    ReplyDelete
  14. I'm happy its blooming, but I'm a little saddened to find out what it is. On the dave's garden profile it was said that they've made it up to Gainesville! As long as they don't get out of control I suppose.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Ami, I found the same orchid in my garden last year, so far no flowers. Thanks for solving the mystery.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Ha! I found wild orchids growing in an abandoned lot in Miami, wish they were in my backyard. You are so lucky. Great find!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Congratulations for getting the name for your adopted orchids. They are definitely lovely and in the future this type of orchids will be demanded more when all those in the markets are the hybrids. I also have some endemics which are small and maybe also good for breeding for some botanical characteristics. However, mine are mostly Phalaenopsis species. Now your flowers become so precious because you waited long for its name.

    ReplyDelete
  18. The reason is that it looks so easy to do and it feels such a shame to spend all that money hiring somebody else. Why not save all that money, we would argue. It is very understandable but totally shallow if you really come to think of it. Looking at it more closely,pest control Melbourne

    ReplyDelete
  19. Hi, I live in Naples, Florida and I too am finding wild orchids all over my yard. I put some in our backyard Oak trees and they seem to be happy. I thought they were Monk orchids but my blooms are quite different from yours. How do I attach a picture? I am hoping that someone will be able to help me identify them. ��
    Tricia

    ReplyDelete
  20. Hi, I live in Naples, Florida and I too am finding wild orchids all over my yard. I put some in our backyard Oak trees and they seem to be happy. I thought they were Monk orchids but my blooms are quite different from yours. How do I attach a picture? I am hoping that someone will be able to help me identify them. ��
    Tricia

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...